Archive for October, 2009

Saving science, in a roundabout way

By • Oct 30th, 2009 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Hey everyone–sorry I haven’t updated in a while. I’ve been busy with classes and with presenting my research in various settings here on campus. I wanted to talk about a new idea I have for settling science’s role in relation to morality. Long story short, I suspect is-ought inferences (except tautologies and presupposed oughts) are […]



From The Duke’s Men to Baz Luhrmann: A Working Production History of English-language Romeo and Juliet

By • Oct 19th, 2009 • Category: Honors Thesis, performance studies, Research, Shakespeare

Production Theory RE: Reconsidering the assumption that there is one “true” text of Romeo and Juliet. “Indeed, it is for this openness, and for its capacity to re- and outlive and stage infinite variations upon its protagonists’ story, that Derrida has described Romeo and Juliet as an ‘anthology’ or ‘palimpest’ or ‘open theater of narratives’, […]

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For Ne’er Was There a Story of More Woe… than that of Liang Shanbo?

By • Oct 10th, 2009 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Of course Chinese directors do not approach the text with Romeo and Juliet with a blank slate.  They, and their audiences, have prior conceptions of what romantic literature and theatre should entail.  Many of those assumptions will have been constructed by Chinese folk stories, popular songs, high literature, movies, TV, you name it.  I have […]

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A Rose by Any Other Name: Adaptation Theory

By • Oct 10th, 2009 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

As mentioned in my previous post, I am trying to structure my own research around a skeleton of Western theory.  I want my thesis to be accessible and usable to my (dare I call them??) colleagues in the fields of Comparative Literature and English.  One of the great aspects of working off a platform of […]

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What’s a Montague?

By • Oct 10th, 2009 • Category: China, Chinese, Honors Thesis, Literature, Research, Shakespeare, Thesis

‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy: Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. What’s Montague? It is nor hand nor foot, Nor arm nor face, nor any other part Belonging to a man.  (II.2. 38-42) My thesis work was thrown off briefly because I had the rare opportunity to present a paper at the […]

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