Archive for October, 2014

Fall Developments: A Return to Interviews

By • Oct 31st, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Happy Halloween, blogosphere! October has been just as busy a month as September, what will fall break and some additional traveling I’ve done on top of that, and I can’t believe how the time has flown. This month’s focus was on further developing the two prongs of my research, and in particular, combing over the…
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How is October already over?

By • Oct 31st, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

This is what all of the work over the summer turns into eventually, this tiny 0.5mL sample of extracted plant tissue. This month I focused on fine-tuning the extraction technique (which is what I do to convert the freeze dried plant sample into a form suitable to run through HPLC). After a 2 day procedure…
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Redrawing Europe?

By • Oct 31st, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

I sat in Amsterdam’s airport waiting for my connection to the US on September 21st, only two days after the Scottish referendum on independence, reflecting on the rare referendum experience I had the incredible opportunity to witness. My decision to use part of my honors thesis research funds to travel to Scotland for the independence…
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October Wrap-Up

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Well, October went by in a rush. There’s been good progress on data collection, even though we’ve run into some technical difficulties with one of our programs in the study. We should be done collecting data by the middle of November, which is exciting. We have a few new lab members who are helping run…
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Long Overdue

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Hello again, lovely people! The past few months have been incredibly busy, filled with lots of graphs and lots of projects for the School of Education. I have learned a lot in this time, but unfortunately, I have neglected blogging. In order to catch up with blog posts, I will be attempting to post every…
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WVT? What?

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Even materials that seem impenetrable often are permeable to small molecules, such as water vapor. Even if foods, like meat in the grocery store, were wrapped perfectly in saran wrap (a polymer), the goods inside would not be able to remain fresh indefinitely. Through very small gaps in the polymer film, vapors can escape and…
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A Belated Update

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Hey everyone! It’s been a busy semester so far and it is hard to believe that it is already almost November! Some exciting progress has been made since I last blogged a few months ago. The Charles Center Summer Research Showcase was a few weeks ago. One thing I really appreciated about the showcase was…
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Successful Retro? Check.

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Finally.  After spending most of this semester making more starting material and performing very precedented reactions, this past week I ran my retro Diels-Alder (see figure below).  And it worked! Professor Scheerer and I both believe that we didn’t encounter the rearrangement problem we ran into this summer which means I am only three steps…
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Dating the site

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: archaeology, Honors Thesis, Research

I think due to my internet connection in Barbados, my posts may have not gotten through.  I apologize for posting so late. Artifacts found at the site range from prehistoric in origin to the late twentieth century.  Recording stratigraphy for the site was very difficult due to the sand being all the same color, so…
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Digging information

By • Oct 30th, 2014 • Category: archaeology, Honors Thesis, Research

Here’s some more you guys. The project began in proper after a meeting with Church of Jesus the Good Shepherd’s priest, Reverend Wayne Kirton.  Rev. Kirton was aware of the site’s history, and had been interested prior to the project in having the wall studied and preserved, as wear from automobile traffic as well as…
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