Author Archive

Mining and Economic Development

By • Dec 5th, 2009 • Category: Economics, Final Projects, history, Honors Thesis, Research

Is extracting natural resources inherently harmful for a country’s economic development? Bolivia, home of the once-largest-in-the-world silver mine of Potosi, is now the second poorest country in the Western Hemisphere (after Haiti). Nonetheless, when we take a careful look at the dynamics of colonial silver mining, particularly mining’s labor institutions, there are a lot of […]

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Imagined Communities: Immigrants, Transnationalism, and the Spanish-Language Media

By • Dec 19th, 2008 • Category: Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Research

Some Hispanic Studies majors instinctively gag when they hear the term “imagined community.” There’s a reason for drilling it into our heads, though: nations are social constructs and a good deal of politics, especially politics of migration, come down to how we imagine our nation. I’ve taken a look here at how two Spanish-language newspapers […]

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Roberto Bolaño and the Bastard Canon

By • Dec 19th, 2008 • Category: Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Research

Roberto Bolaño is an dead Latin American novelist recently proclaimed the most influential of his generation. He wrote The Savage Detectives and 2666. Strangely, he is both canonical and vanguard; he publicly insulted most of his famous predecessors but has inherited their mantle. The attached essay (in Spanish) examines what Bolaño’s canonization tells us about canon formation.   Bolaño […]

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Colonial Science in “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

By • Jul 9th, 2008 • Category: Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Research

In this essay from last year (in Spanish) I outlined the course of scientific discovery presented in One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez and argued that Márquez blames colonial intervention for the lack of progress but expects the problem to disappear given time. The essay in Spanish: Ciencia Colonial en “Cien Años […]

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Don Quixote: Universal Literature Read as a National Novel

By • May 18th, 2008 • Category: Don Quixote, Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Literature, Photography, Research

The summer after my freshman year, I took a Monroe grant from the Charles Center at William and Mary and explored Don Quixote in Spain: “Although many of us are familiar with the universal themes in Don Quixote, some evidence suggests that it can also be read as a “national” novel about Spain. Curious, I […]

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Barriers – A walk through a divided city

By • May 14th, 2008 • Category: Honors Thesis, Research

Julie Riggs and I (Alex Douglas) put together this photographic/poetic essay as our project for the forum. It ties a few Hispanic Studies issues into Urban Planning and “reads” the city. We’ve made it into a powerpoint for simplicity. It ought to be presented along with a commentary, but that has yet to be written; […]

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Dictatorship, Resistence, and Gender

By • May 8th, 2008 • Category: Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Literature, Research

Here’s another one of my final papers from this semester. The basic idea is that dictatorships attempt to legitimize their power by associating themselves with hierarchical gender narratives. I approach the topic by examining the distinct approaches of two resistence plays: “Death and the Maiden” by Chilean Ariel Dorfman and “Antígona Furiosa” by Argentine Griselda […]

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Legal Status and Wages

By • May 7th, 2008 • Category: Economics, Final Projects, Honors Thesis, Research

Here’s an Econ paper I just finished writing: amnesty_and_wages.pdf It’s not particularly conclusive, but it takes a stab at the question of whether legal status increases immigrants’ wages directly.

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“Barriers” – a walk through a divided city

By • May 7th, 2008 • Category: Final Projects, Fotography, Hispanic Studies, Honors Thesis, Research

Julie Riggs and I put together this photographic/poetic essay after a week in DC with the Hispanic Studies research forum. It ties a few Hispanic Studies issues into Urban Planning and “reads” the city. We’ve made it into a powerpoint for simplicity. UPDATE: the files now include an introduction!   “Barriers” – English version “Barreras” […]

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