Archives for the ‘Economics’ Category

Economics of Faith, Race, and Religion: Data Analysis 1 (June 29-July 6)

By • Aug 27th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

I am proceeding with the instructions from Professor Parman. He suggested that I do both ordered logistic regressions (ologits) and regular regressions, and to also look at the residuals of my regressions. I also used bin scatters this week and worked through my missing data issue.   I started to implement my ologit and linear […]

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Economics of Faith, Race, and Community: Programming (June 21-28)

By • Aug 26th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

How exactly does religion inform decision making? Is a causal interpretation possible? This week, I begin to program into Stata with the Pew Research data. On Tuesday, I had to do some programming in Stata to calculate the religious density: to do so, I collapsed the data for the number of people of a religion […]

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Economics of Faith, Race, and Community: Reframing (June 13-20)

By • Aug 26th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

Turns out, I don’t have geographical information in the GSS, which is what Gruber used to predict religious attendance using religious market density. Gruber uses geographical data to compute religious market density to then predict religious attendance. He then uses that religious market density from the GSS to predict outcomes in IPUMS–he computes predicted religious […]

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Economics of Faith, Race and Community: Getting Started (June 6-13)

By • Aug 24th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

I took notes as the weeks of my project progressed. The blog posts that follow are summaries of my work, my struggles, and my overall thought progress throughout the summer project. June 6-13: Getting Started   As per my abstract, my project intends to is to replicate and then revise Jonathan Gruber’s 2005 paper that […]

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Economics of Religion: Race, Faith, and Community – Abstract

By • Apr 15th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

As religion informs the values and beliefs of many Americans, religion plays a role in economic development. Previous research already shows that certain aspects of communities affect economic outcomes; this research project seeks to determine the distinct role of religious communities in influencing economic outcomes like education and income levels. Drawing upon the previous work of Jonathan Gruber (2005), whose […]

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Track and Predict the Growth of the Rising E-sports Industry

By • Apr 11th, 2019 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

E-sports is a form of sports where players and teams compete with each other using video games. It is mostly coordinated by different leagues, scales, and tournaments, where players join teams and organizations sponsored by various companies. The number of video game players has been growing at a rate of 10 to 15 percent per […]

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Post #3: Final Update – Literature Review/Project Summary

By • Aug 22nd, 2018 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

Hi everyone, I have just completed revising and editing my completed Literature Review/Monroe Freshman research project, and I’m so excited to be submitting this to my project advisor soon! I haven’t kept her as updated as I hoped (through my own fault, though she agreed to be a more hands-off advisor), but I hope she […]

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College Sports Attendance & Gender – Final Update

By • Aug 20th, 2018 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

First off, I took another approach to look at the data set. I used the controlled ratio I discussed in my previous post and compared the average value for basketball conferences. I took the average ratio for each conferences and then grouped the larger, well-known conferences known as the Power 6 (Big Ten, Big 12, SEC, […]

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Post #2: Completion of Reading, Outlining Literature Review, and Further Updates

By • Aug 19th, 2018 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

Hello, everyone! I am almost done with my research project, and I have been working hard this past month to complete my reading and plan out how I wanted to organize my literature review. I have read over 50 academic papers and had over 100 pages of notes, ranging from topics such as brand loyalty, advertising, […]

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College Sports Attendance & Gender – Update 2

By • Aug 5th, 2018 • Category: Economics, Honors Thesis, Research

So I decided to add a little more to the project than I had originally planned. Considering the website I was using to collect data had data all the way back from 2009, I thought seeing how differences were playing out over time would be interesting to see. I also decided to reevaluate the ratio […]

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