Archives for the ‘history’ Category

Abstract: American Performance History of Othello, 1821-1945

By • Apr 17th, 2019 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research, Thesis

Othello is a Shakespearean tragedy about a dark-skinned man (Othello) who is tricked into murdering his younger white wife. Othello has always held a fascination in the United States, particularly during the Antebellum period.  In the 1820s, white critics insisted that Shakespeare intended Othello to be white. They believed that Shakespeare was too sophisticated to…
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Abstract: The American Missionaries’ role in US perception and foreign policy to China during Chinese Civil War, 1945-1949

By • Apr 17th, 2019 • Category: China, history, Honors Thesis, Research

Research Topic: This summer, I will explore a set of related questions centering on the American missionaries’ role in US perception of and foreign policy to China during the Chinese Civil War from 1945 to 1949, also known as the Chinese Communist Revolution. Below are the specific research questions: How American missionaries perceived and understood […]

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Protestant Female Medical Missionaries to China: Gender, Religious Feminism, and U.S. Imperial Culture, 1885 – 1925

By • Apr 10th, 2019 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

American Christian missionaries have received increasing scholarly attention because of their close relationship with formal imperial activities of the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. However, few scholars have systematically studied the work of American female medical missionaries, an important group in the Protestant mission, and the gender politics that played…
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Queens of the Republican Court!

By • Apr 10th, 2019 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

Hello everyone!   My name is Tessa Payer, and I am more than excited to share my thesis research with you! I am a history/theatre double major and someone particularly interested in women’s history. I was lucky enough to explore women’s experiences during the 18th and early 19th centuries last summer, conducting Monroe Scholar research…
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Abstract: Incongruence in Jefferson’s Legacy – The Controversy over the Jefferson Memorial

By • Mar 26th, 2019 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial was constructed along the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. between 1938 and 1943. Immediately after the plans for the memorial were first released, there was an uproar from the American people about the design, functionality, and location of the memorial. Historians have argued that Jefferson’s reputation was revived in the 1930s […]

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Paper Archives in a Digital World: Researching at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Headquarters

By • Mar 25th, 2019 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

On a foggy morning in December, I trekked across the long National Mall and onto the busy streets of Washington D. C. The clouds were so low and thick that the pointy top of the Washington Monument was lost in an upside-down sea of gray. As I hurried past the White House and bounded through […]

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3/20 Introduction to History Summer Research Project

By • Mar 23rd, 2019 • Category: China, history, Honors Thesis, Research

Dear all, I am thrilled to announce the commencement of my summer research project on early-twentieth-century Chinese constitutionalism. I wish you enjoyed the following introduction of my project and discussion of the topic’s historical significance.   The Little-known Modernity: The Late-Qing Constitutionalist Reform, 1901-1911 Department: History       Applicant: Zhengyuan Ling       Advisor: Eric […]

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Weekly Report 1028-Revised Proposal

By • Oct 30th, 2018 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

Weekly Report 1028   Research Topic: Confucianism in the Development of Japanese Nationalism Advisor: Professor Eric Han My Honors research project concentrates on Confucianism in pre-modern Japan since the eighteenth century and its role in the development of Japanese nationalism. Confucianism in Edo-era Japan (1603-1868 C.E.) conduced the notion of Japanese proto-nationalism by advocating the…
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Weekly Report 1020-Proposed Structure and Annotated Bibliography

By • Oct 28th, 2018 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

Weekly Report 1020 Proposed Structure of the Thesis and Annotated Bibliography   Structure of the Thesis Introduction: Thesis + Abstract Confucianism in early-modern Japan (Azuchi-Momoyama and Edo periods) as both the indigenous origin of Japanese proto-nationalism and the mechanism that localized western Nationalism. Reference of Kiri Paramore’s Japanese Confucianism + primary source analysis of early-modern…
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Weekly Report 1007-State of Field Synthesis

By • Oct 8th, 2018 • Category: history, Honors Thesis, Research

Zhengyuan Paul Ling History 494 Professor Limoncelli 10/02/2018 State of Field Essay Interconnecting the study of Confucianism in Japan and that of Japanese Nationalism is a comparatively novel approach within the East Asian historical studies society. In this millennium, Kiri Paramore and his Japanese Confucianism revive and interact with the discussion of both topics, upon…
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